Global Lung Cancer Coalition Patient Charter

The Global Lung Cancer Coalition Patient Charter is an affirmation by all the member organisations of the basic rights that all lung cancer patients should be granted.

  • Recognising that lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women world-wide; this year it will kill more people than breast, prostate, and colon cancer combined. Only 4 in 10 lung cancer sufferers today can expect to survive for more than one year, the worst rate amongst all the major types of cancer.
  • Aware of the fact that funding for lung cancer research falls far short of that for other less fatal diseases. Lack of investment in research has left lung cancer patients with few treatment options and, even now, many patients do not receive the best treatment available.
  • Acknowledging that most lung cancers are discovered when the disease is far advanced and there is currently no approved screening for lung cancer which would detect smaller, and more curable tumours.
  • Troubled by lung cancer patients’ isolation, the uphill struggle they face in fighting for their rights and their frequent unwillingness to seek treatment promptly because of the stigma associated with a tobacco-related disease, and recognising how negative attitudes about lung cancer held by professional carers, policy-makers and the general public compound this situation,

WE THE GLOBAL LUNG CANCER COALITION HEREBY ADOPT THIS CHARTER AND CALL UPON ITS OBSERVANCE BY ALL CONCERNED ON BEHALF OF THE MORE THAN 1.3 MILLION PEOPLE LIVING WITH LUNG CANCER AROUND THE WORLD AND THE COUNTLESS MILLIONS MORE AT RISK FOR THE DISEASE.

The Rights of People with Lung Cancer

In addition to the right of every patient to be treated with dignity and respect, the Global Lung Cancer Coalition reaffirms the right of all lung cancer patients to have access to quality health care; informed self-determination; physical and mental integrity; and confidentiality and privacy,

Along with these fundamental rights, lung cancer patients have the right to:

  • Have the enormous burden of lung cancer acknowledged by professional carers, policy makers and the general public
  • Have access to optimal treatment as suggested by a multi-disciplinary team of medical professionals, which should possess specialist knowledge about lung cancer
  • Have their voice heard in corridors of power as evidenced by the allocation of an equitable portion of available funds to lung cancer research and treatment
  • Witness the widespread implementation of well structured, evidence-based programs of early diagnosis and timely medical referral
  • Be free of blame and stigma for having the disease and to have their disease de-stigmatised.
  • Help to give up smoking, if a smoker, and not to be denied treatment or support if they are unable to overcome their addiction.